Seven Exercises You Can Do In Bed

exercise in bedFINAL     Bed exercises are a healthy way to help you get in shape, burn calories, tone you up, and transform your body.  They’re convenient for all kinds of reasons.  Perhaps you have neither the time nor the desire to get up extra early to do a morning workout at the gym.  Some bed exercise in the morning can get you perked up and firing on all cylinders to start the day with an advantage.  Done in the evening they can help you get a restful evening of sleep.  They  stimulate the production of the mood-enhancing brain chemical serotonin, leaving you feeling calm and relaxed.  As a result, you will find that you sleep better when you do these exercises at night, and feel invigorated when you do the routine in the morning. Here are a few bed exercises you can do that won’t take more than 10 minutes out of your busy schedule.  They are designed for anyone, but they can be especially helpful for people recovering from an illness or injury and confined to bed and for people who just can’t find time during the day to exercise.

Important:  When you perform these exercises, breathe in slowly while you count to four, hold for a count of one, and then exhale for a count of four.

ARMS-SHOULDER SEESAW
Purpose: Tones and stretches the shoulders and upper back.
What to do: While lying on your back, place your arms at your sides. Slide your right arm and shoulder toward your right foot. Next, raise your right shoulder toward your head, while at the same time sliding your left arm and shoulder toward your left foot. Then raise your left shoulder toward your head, while lowering your right arm and shoulder toward your right foot. Repeat five times on each side, moving your shoulders up and down like a seesaw.  Continue reading Seven Exercises You Can Do In Bed

Healthy, Stronger Core Explained

AbdominalsCore Strengthening   has become the new “buzz” word over the last few years as more and more people have begun to realize its role in posture, spinal health, performance and total aesthetics. What is less ordinarily known is that the core is anatomically defined as the region between the shoulders and knees, not simply the midsection. Most people view the core as simply being their abdominal muscles and, as such, miss out on a tremendous amount of value that other functional movements provide.

When I refer to the core I allude to the inner and outer units of our body. The inner unit consists of smaller, more static stabilizing muscles such as the transverse abdominis, multifidus, and the pelvic floor and diaphragmatic musculature. The outer unit is comprised of bigger phasic (or dynamic) muscles that make movement such as the gluteals, latissimus dorsi, erector spinae Grouping, biceps femoris, and peroneals. Aside from generating movement, these muscles work synergistically to provide much needed pelvic stability during motions such as walking, running, and so forth.  Due to the fact that all functional movements  such as lunges, squats, step-ups, most stability ball movements, and many others revolve around the pelvis, they will offer tremendous core training effects when done with proper technique. The following are 5 tips you can use to train the inner and outer units of your core with maximum efficiency.  Continue reading Healthy, Stronger Core Explained